Lesson 140 – Parts of the Sentence – Pronouns

Pronouns take the place of nouns. Personal pronouns have what is called case. Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence. There are three cases: nominative, objective, and possessive. Many mistakes are made in the use of nominative and objective case pronouns. Memorizing each list will help you use them correctly.
Nominative case pronouns are I, she, he, we, they, and who. They are used as subjects, predicate nominatives, and appositives when used with a subject or predicate nominative.
Objective case pronouns are me, her, him, us, them, and whom. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of the preposition, and appositives when used with one of the objects. (We will learn about indirect objects and objects of the preposition in later lessons.) (You and it are both nominative and objective case.)
Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their and theirs. They are used to show ownership.
Instructions: Choose the correct form of the pronoun and tell why you chose it.
1. Where were you and (she, her)?
2. No, it was not (us, we).
3. The writer is (he, him).
4. The group was not expecting (I, me).
5. The winners were (they, them), John and (him, he).
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. she – subject
2. we – predicate nominative
3. he – predicate nominative
4. me – direct object
5. they – predicate nominative, he – an appositive to the predicate nominative

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/03/lesson-140-parts-of-sentence-pronouns.html

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