Quiz for Lessons 281 – 285 – Parts of the Sentence – Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.
If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, orverbal phrase modify.
If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.
1. We offered whoever caused the accident a chance to confess.
2. The man whose leg was amputated was glad to be alive.
3. The judge is the person to whom you should talk.
4. When the mayor explained his plan, the citizens were pleased.
5. It is unfortunate that you do not agree.
6. The news that thousands had been killed was correct.
7. This house is where your grandmother lived.
8. Why you don’t like him is hard to understand.
9. If you are unable to find it, call me at home.
10. The manager said that everyone would get a raise.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. offered = verb, we = subject, chance = direct object, a = adjective modifying chance, to confess = adjective infinitive used as object complement; (whoever caused the accident) = noun clause used as an indirect object, caused = verb, whoever = noun clause introductory word used as the subject, accident = direct object, the = adjective modifying accident
2. was = verb, man = subject, the = adjective modifying man, glad = predicate adjective modifying man, to be = adverb infinitive modifying glad, alive = predicate adjective to the infinitive to be; (whose leg was amputated) = adjective clause modifying man, was amputated = verb, leg = subject, whose = adjective modifying leg
3. is = verb, judge = subject, person = predicate nominative, the = adjective modifying judge, the = adjective modifying person; to whom you should talk = adjective prepositional phrase modifying person, (whom you should talk) = noun clause used as the object of the preposition, should talk = verb, you = subject, whom = noun clause introductory word used as the direct object
4. were pleased = verb, citizens = subject, the = adjective modifying citizens; (when the mayor explained his plan) = adverb clause modifying were pleased, explained = verb, mayor = subject, plan = direct object, the = adjective modifying mayor, his = adjective modifying plan, when = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
5. is = verb, it = subject, unfortunate = predicate adjective modifying it; (that you do not agree) = adverb clause modifying unfortunate, do agree = verb, you = subject, not = adverb modifying do agree, that = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
6. was = verb, news = subject, correct = predicate adjective modifying news, the = adjective modifying news; (that thousands had been killed) = noun clause used as an appositive, had been killed = verb, thousands = subject, that = noun introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence
7. is = verb, house = subject, this = adjective modifying house; (where your grandmother lived) = noun clause used as a predicate nominative, lived = verb, grandmother = subject, your = adjective modifying grandmother, where = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying lived
8. is = verb; (why you don’t like him) = noun clause used as the subject, do like = verb, you = subject, him = direct object, n’t = adverb modifying do like, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying do like; hard = predicate adjective modifying the noun clause, to understand = adverb infinitive modifying hard
9. call = verb, (you understood) = subject, me = direct object, at home = adverb prepositional phrase modifying call, at = preposition, home = object of the preposition; (if you are unable to find it) = adverb clause modifying call, are = verb, you = subject, unable = predicate adjective modifying you, to find = adverb infinitive modifying unable, it = direct object to the infinitive, if = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
10. said = verb, manager = subject, the = adjective modifying manager; (that everyone would get a raise) = noun clause used as the direct object, would get = verb, everyone = subject, raise = direct object, a = adjective modifying raise, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/quiz-for-lessons-281-285-parts-of.html

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9 Ways to Discuss Frequent Career Changes in a Job Interview

Your recent work history is a bit flighty.

No position in the last few years has lasted longer than a year or so.

There are already so many ways to mess up in an interview.

You have great skills and dedication; how do you communicate it to a hiring team when your resume screams something else?

Here are our best tips for handling frequent career changes during the hiring process.

1Don’t draw extra attention to the frequent changes.

This one should be pretty obvious, but standard approaches to resume-writing basically highlight the chronology of your work history.

Consider teeing up your experience in a less conventional way. Functional resumes focus on skills and achievements rather than pure work experience. More simply, consider re-positioning the typical “Work History” section as “Experience” and include any relevant projects or volunteering.

2Make sure you can explain each move as a progression.

For any experience on your resume—but especially for frequent career changes—take time to think through and practice talking about your experience story. Try to frame all your experience as the necessary and inevitable path that culminates with this new employer.

To this end, focus on what you learned and how each change was good for your growth. Bonus points if you can connect any of these growth points to skills you will need for the prospective job.

3Emphasize what you learned and what you achieved.

When you’re putting together your “Experience Narrative,” making all those career changes make sense will really come down to how much growth and achievement you can show in spite of those short stints. For each position, nail down what specifically you learned and what you achieved in concrete terms.

Here’s a tip:
Frequent career changes are a red flag to employers. Each hire is an investment, so they want new hires to stick around and provide a return on that investment.

When you are discussing your growth and achievements, keep in mind that you are trying to convince your interviewer that they will get that return. Make sure that you have a clear sense of your past successes and can discuss them at length.

4Focus on the pain points you’re good at fixing.

Prior to your interview, make sure you get a good grasp of the needs of the company and how the job you’re applying for is meant to meet those needs. Next, compare those needs to your skills and achievements. Identify those problems that your skills will be able to solve.

During your interview, find ways to relate and discuss those skills in relation to the problems you identified. Take time to highlight your strengths here and take a stab at initial problem-solving with your interviewer. This will not only emphasize the applicability of your skillset, but also shows your familiarity with the company and eagerness to work on these issues.

5Highlight the long-term commitments you do have.

If you have long-term commitments in other parts of your life—whether it’s a long-term volunteering position or even years spent training for a sport—take whatever you have and make it clear on your resume.

During your interview, if the issue of commitment comes up, it’s fine to acknowledge it. However, try to emphasize that you do have experience with long-term projects or endeavors—and that you see a lot of potential with the prospective company.

6It’s OK to have bowed out over structural changes.

If some of your recent career moves were due to mergers and organizational changes, be ready to briefly discuss those circumstances. It’s understandable, for example, that after a merger the management and roles on your team shifted and left you without a clear path for growth.

7Deemphasize lateral career changes in the same field.

Interviewers strongly frown upon lateral career changes where you essentially move into the same position, especially if that move is within the same industry. It’s good to de-emphasize these shifts in your resume and focus on them in your interview prep so that you can successfully explain the story and growth from that change.

8Never make it about money.

Here’s a tip:
Don’t bring up the money question during your interviewing process. Let the interviewing team initiate that conversation.

If an interviewer asks you why you left a job and you respond that it was because of the pay, you don’t look savvy. Suddenly it appears that you only care about money and become a flight risk to the hiring team.

9Ask about career growth.

Do you know what sends a good signal about your willingness to put down roots?

Painting a picture of a future together. You don’t have to do this explicitly, but you can send good signals by asking about career development within the company. It shows that you are planning for your future, and you’re open to that future being with this new company.

Have you frequently changed jobs and successfully negotiated an interview? What worked best for you?

The post 9 Ways to Discuss Frequent Career Changes in a Job Interview appeared first on Grammarly Blog.

from Grammarly Blog https://www.grammarly.com/blog/frequent-career-changes/

Lesson 285 – Parts of the Sentence – Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.
If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, orverbal phrase modify.
If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.
1. Now I understand why you didn’t tell me.
2. Whenever you do well, you will be rewarded.
3. The instrument that he plays is not the French horn.
4. Sam explained how you could save money daily.
5. The man whom I met at the store knew my father.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. understand = verb, I = subject, now = adverb modifying understand; (why you didn’t tell me) = noun clause used as the direct object, did tell = verb, you = subject, me = direct object, n’t = adverb modifying did tell, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying did  tell
2. will be rewarded = verb, you = subject; (whenever you do well) = adverb clause modifying will be rewarded, do = verb, you = subject, well = adverb modifying do, whenever = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
3. is = verb, instrument = subject, the = adjective modifying instrument, horn = predicate nominative, the/French = adjectives modifying horn; (that he plays) = adjective clause modifying instrument, plays = verb, he = subject, that = adjective clause introductory word used as a direct object
4. explained = verb, Sam = subject; (how you could save money daily) = noun clause used as the direct object, could save = verb, you = subject, money = direct object, how/daily = adverbs modifying could save
5. knew = verb, man = subject, father = direct object, my = adjective modifying father, the = adjective modifying man; (whom I met at the store) = adjective clause modifying man, met = verb, I = subject, whom = adjective clause introductory word used as the direct object to met, at the store = adverb prepositional phrase modifying met, at = preposition, store = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying store

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-285-parts-of-sentence-clauses.html

7 Smart Ways to Handle Negativity on Social Media

You’ve just poured your heart into your latest blog post. You got real! You got vulnerable!

…And now a total stranger is publicly ridiculing you.

Life on the Internet can be stressful. As you express your experiences and opinions, you are bound to run into the naysayers, the haters, and the outright trolls.

Dealing with these characters may not be fun, but they don’t have to ruin your day. Here are seven smart ways to handle negativity on social media and come out on top.

1Don’t Feed the Trolls

The simplest and most direct way to destroy trolls’ power? Ignore their hateful comments and refuse to engage with their negativity.

Trolls feed on attention. Your frustration and anger are their goal. When you indignantly reply to an ugly comment, you’re giving them exactly what they want.

Your anger at injustice and desire to prove your point will tempt you to argue with them, but remember: trolls aren’t interested in productive dialogue. They will twist your words, accuse you, and make non-factual statements—they will not concede.

It doesn’t matter how intelligently you present your point, the argument will only devolve further, resulting in a colossal waste of time and emotional energy. But when you deprive a troll of attention, they’ll soon slink away to sow discord somewhere else.

2Champion a Supportive Community

Say you’re reading a friend’s blog (or Facebook post or Twitter feed…) and you see that someone has left a nasty comment.

Instead of engaging directly with the troll (giving them the power and attention they want), respond with a positive comment for your friend. Let your friend know how much you enjoyed their post and that you appreciate her sharing it.

Your support will mean a lot to your friend and will encourage others to speak up, unleashing an avalanche of positive support to drown out the negativity.

Whenever possible, do your part to foster a supportive online community where people feel safe to have real dialogue, listen, ask questions, and express their points respectfully.

3Provide the Facts

Trolls frequently spout misinformation, propping up their arguments with factually inaccurate assertions. This can confuse other readers and make a troll’s argument sound credible to those who don’t know the truth.

If you see a troll making inaccurate statements, on your own social media post or someone else’s, share some primary sources that refute their arguments and back up the facts.

You are doing this to educate other readers, so don’t respond to the troll directly (shouting matches will ensue). Instead, leave a comment such as “Hey folks, there seems to be some confusion around [issue].” Then calmly state the facts and your sources.

4Respond With Humor or Kindness

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via GIPHY

Trolls only have as much power as you allow them to have. You can disarm their attack by showing them just how little you take their hateful words seriously.

Respond to them with a witty retort or thank them for their comment.

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Just remember, keep things clever and focus on deflecting their words—don’t sink to their level of ugliness or engage in personal attacks.

5Report Harassment

If someone is making you uncomfortable or even threatening you on social media, don’t hesitate to report them. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other major sites all allow you to file complaints about abusive behavior. Many platforms also have a “block” or “ignore” feature you can use to stop receiving the bully’s harassment.

If you personally moderate an online community, such as a Facebook group or message board, consider creating a “rules of conduct” post. If someone behaves inappropriately, you’ll have a clear justification for booting them and defense against any claims that they’re being singled out.

6Repair the Relationship

Sometimes the people who argue with us on the Internet aren’t vicious strangers—they’re friends and family. If you and your uncle are duking it out on a Facebook thread, maybe take a moment to pause and consider how much you value the relationship.

If this is a person you don’t agree with, but you still want to have an amicable relationship with, consider sending them a private message or ask if they’re open to a phone call to work things out.

In the public theater of the Internet, it can be difficult to admit “I was wrong” or “You really hurt me.” Continuing the conversation via private channels can help facilitate a peaceful solution.

7Practice Self-Care

Dealing with negativity can be exhausting and discouraging, so remember to take care of yourself. If a rude comment really got to you, call a trusted friend to vent and get perspective.

Remember, no matter how “personal” a comment may seem—such as someone on Instagram criticizing your weight—those hateful words are coming from their insecurities and baggage. You don’t have to let their issues ruin your day.

Be secure in your value, focus on the positives, and let the negatives fade into the background.

The post 7 Smart Ways to Handle Negativity on Social Media appeared first on Grammarly Blog.

from Grammarly Blog https://www.grammarly.com/blog/social-media-negativity/

Lesson 284 – Parts of the Sentence – Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.
If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, orverbal phrase modify.
If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.
1. Joe thinks he can win at the slots.
2. That one should always do his best is certain to bring success.
3. The fact was that I was not in town.
4. The girl ran more quickly to her mother than her brother.
5. Although a skilled person will be better prepared, he may not find work.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. thinks = verb, Joe = subject; (he can win at the slots) = noun clause used as the direct object with an understood introductory word that, can win = verb, he = subject, at the slots = adverb prepositional phrase modifying can win, at = preposition, slots = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying slots
2. is = verb, (that one should always do his best) = noun clause used as the subject, should do = verb, one = subject, best = direct object, his = adjective modifying best, always = adverb modifying should do, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence; certain = predicate adjective modifying (that one should always do his best) the subject, to bring = adverb infinitive modifying certain, success = direct object to the infinitive to bring
3. was = verb, fact = subject, the = adjective modifying fact; (that I was not in town) = noun clause used as the predicate nominative, was = verb, I = subject, not = adverb modifying was, in town = adverb prepositional phrase modifying was, in = preposition, town = object of the preposition, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the  sentence
4. ran = verb, girl = subject, the = adjective modifying girl, quickly = adverb modifying ran, more = adverb modifying quickly, to her mother = adverb prepositional phrase modifying ran, to = preposition, mother = object of the preposition, her = adjective modifying mother; (than her brother [ran quickly to his mother] understood part of the clause) = adverb elliptical clause modifying more, ran = understood verb, brother = subject, her = adjective modifying brother, quickly = understood adverb modifying understood ran, to his mother = understood prepositional phrase modifying ran, to = understood preposition, mother = understood object of the preposition, his = understood adjective modifying mother, than = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
5. may find = verb, he = subject, work = direct object, not = adverb modifying may find; (although a skilled person will be better prepared) = adverb clause modifying may find, will be = verb, person = subject, a = adjective modifying person, skilled = participle modifying person, prepared = participle modifying person used as the predicate adjective, better = adverb modifying prepared, although = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-284-parts-of-sentence-clauses.html

How to Adapt Your CV for an American Company

Many people dream of living and working in the USA, but no one would claim it’s easy. To secure a work visa, you’ll need a job offer before you leave – which means perfecting your CV is more important than ever. Don’t simply roll out the CV you’ve been using at home; there are a few key differences you’ll need to know first. Before you hit send, check through this list of tips to make sure American employers can easily see what a great candidate you are.

1 Your CV is no longer a CV!

While languages as diverse as Arabic, Spanish and British English use the term (short for the Latin curriculum vitae) American English prefers the term résumé. It’s important not to neglect this detail as the term CV is used in America, but only in academia.

2 Lose the photo

In many countries it’s normal to include a photo of yourself, and it’s tempting to try to get the employer to picture you in the office, looking dynamic and ready to work. But the USA has strict laws concerning discrimination, so employers can’t be seen to be making decisions based on any aspect of your appearance. You should also remove any details about your marital status, ethnicity, date or place of birth, parents’ names or religion. All you need in terms of personal information is your name, contact details and where to find you on LinkedIn.

3 Keep it short

The name change signals a change of attitude. This is a summary of your skills and achievements, rather than a detailed account of your working life. On average, employers spend only six seconds looking at your résumé! Aim for a single page, or two at the very most. Cut out irrelevant hobbies or unrelated positions you held years ago. After your contact details, recruiters will be looking for:

  • Summary statement – a few short, strong statements that sum up why you’re the perfect candidate for this job
  • Professional experience – start with the most recent position and work backwards
  • Skills – this could include relevant computer programs you can use or languages you speak
  • Education – unless you are a very recent or current student, keep this down to a line or two and put it toward the end of the résumé, not at the beginning

If English is your second language, you may be tempted to prove your proficiency by including your TOEFL score. Don’t! Your fluency should speak for itself. But the fact that you are bilingual is a big bonus – list it under skills.

4 Third or first person?

Should you write “Maria has exceptional organizational skills,” or “I have exceptional organizational skills?” This question raises some surprisingly strong feelings. Not so long ago, the advice was to use the third person, and some employers still feel this avoids the impression that you’re just stating your own opinion of yourself. On the other hand, you are stating your opinion of yourself, and as a result many employers hate third person résumés, finding them weird and artificial. Our advice: where a pronoun is unavoidable, use “I,” but in so-called “résumese,” it’s acceptable to avoid pronouns altogether and even to drop the occasional verb. For example: “A manager with exceptional organizational skills. Successfully increased staff retention by 50%.”

Whatever you do, don’t mix “I” with “he/she”!

5 Use action verbs

American culture isn’t big on modesty. Where some cultures would see boastfulness, Americans see confidence and straightforwardness. This doesn’t mean you should make grandiose claims of personal perfection, but it does mean that when explaining your employment history, you should focus on the successes you achieved, not just your duties and responsibilities. You can approach this by avoiding the passive voice and by replacing verbs like “worked on,” “handled” and “was responsible for” with bolder alternatives like “accomplished,” “created,” “increased,” “transformed” or “led,” as well as by giving specific examples of your results.

For example, “handled fundraising” could become “raised $105,000 in new donations in 2017.” Don’t worry about showing off – if you think back, you’ll probably find more relevant achievements than you expect!

7 Avoid clichés

Don’t claim to be “passionate” about your field – is anyone really passionate about, say, data management? And even if your work truly is your passion, the word is so overused that it no longer communicates anything. Instead, tell a story that demonstrates your depth of commitment in your cover letter, or include a bullet point that showcases the results your enthusiasm has helped you achieve. Don’t claim to be a “good team player” or “hard worker” and don’t boast of your “communication skills.” These are vague virtues that employers will tend to assume everyone should have! Give examples of times you’ve taken on extra responsibility, or times you’ve collaborated with others to accomplish something tangible.

8 Don’t forget American vocabulary!

Make sure to use American terms throughout. Even if it feels strange to change your job titles, use “attorney” instead of “solicitor,” “realtor” rather than “estate agent.” Write all dates in the American format: month/day/year. Finally, switch your spell-check to “US English” and do a last sweep to be sure you’re describing your skills as “analyzing” data, not “analysing” it and writing “programs” not “programmes.” And of course, you’ll want to proofread multiple times to be sure that your spelling and grammar is perfect.

9 Nail the cover letter

In some countries a cover letter (or these days, a covering email) is optional, but an American employer won’t even consider an application without a letter – which needs to be individually tailored to every job you apply for. If at all possible, find out the name of the person who will be receiving the letter and address it to them, “Dear Mr./Ms./Mrs. [xxx].” Even if you really can’t find a specific name, don’t lead with “Dear Sir” – female recruiters will not appreciate it. “Dear Hiring Manager” is an acceptable alternative.
Like your résumé, your cover letter should be short – no more than one page. It’s the first thing that employers read, which means it’s your best chance to grab the recruiter’s attention: make it clear why you are interested in this particular company, and why they should be interested in you.

Once again, don’t be shy – Americans appreciate self-confidence and will expect you to be proud of your achievements.

Kaplan International English is part of Kaplan Inc., a global education and career services company. With 40 language schools across 6 English-speaking countries, Kaplan helps 50,000 students from 150 countries each year go further with English. Our courses include Business English and preparation for exams such as TOEFL® and GMAT®.

The post How to Adapt Your CV for an American Company appeared first on Grammarly Blog.

from Grammarly Blog https://www.grammarly.com/blog/how-to-adapt-cv-for-american-company/

Lesson 283 – Parts of the Sentence – Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.
If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, orverbal phrase modify.
If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.
1. The woman had several broken bones because her bones were weak.
2. What the man wanted was a free ride through life.
3. I hope that I can learn to use the computer.
4. Do not eat the fruit that has fallen on the ground.
5. We waited until the doctor reported the operation a success.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. had = verb, woman = subject, bones = direct object, the = adjective modifying woman, several = adjective modifying bones, broken = participle modifying bones; (because her bones were weak) = adverb clause modifying the verb had, were = verb, bones = subject, weak = predicate adjective modifying bones, her = adjective modifying bones, because = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
2. was = verb, (what the man wanted) = noun clause used as the subject, wanted = verb, man = subject, what = noun introductory word used as the direct object, the = adjective modifying man; ride = predicate nominative, a/free = adjectives modifying ride, through life = adjective prepositional phrase modifying ride, through = preposition, life = object of the preposition
3. hope = verb, I = subject; (that I can learn to use the computer) = noun clause used as the direct object, can learn = verb, I = subject, to use the computer = infinitive phrase used as the direct object, to use = infinitive, computer = direct object of the infinitive to use, the = adjective modifying computer, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence
4. do eat = verb, (you understood) = subject, fruit = direct object, the = adjective modifying fruit, not = adverb modifying do eat; (that has fallen on the ground) = adjective clause modifying fruit, has fallen = verb, that = adjective clause introductory word used as the subject equaling fruit, on the ground = adverb prepositional phrase modifying has fallen, on = preposition, ground = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying ground
5. waited = verb, we = subject; (until the doctor reported the operation a success) = adverb clause modifying waited, reported = verb, doctor = subject, operation = direct object, the = adjective modifying doctor, the = adjective modifying operation, success = object complement modifying operation, a = adjective modifying success, until = subordinate conjunction introducing an adverb clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-283-parts-of-sentence-clauses.html